Dear Piper

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Hi Church! 

The picture above was posted online this week in an online group of which I'm a part. It's written from one older parishioner to the daughter of the person who posted it. What a picture of the household of God in action. What a simple and generous expression of life together in Jesus.

This Sunday we have our annual Parish Meeting following worship. We'll gather for a vote on new Parish Council members, for reports on the past year and the year to come, and a presentation regarding the financial affairs of the church. It is good and important institutional work. I encourage you to be there, whether you are formally a member of COTC or not, as a way to participate further in what God is doing. The meeting itself should take about 40 minutes and childcare will be available. 

While the work of the meeting is good and necessary for our functioning as a Gospel-proclaiming institution the letter above is reminder of the organic nature of our life together. Votes and budgets are a part of our life but the communion we share is something more. Expressions like the letter above are a reminder of the love that we partake of together and share. We are unified in the worship of Jesus, and by God's grace stand together in the love of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. 

So, come to the meeting on Sunday as you are able, but also, be reminded of the deeper reality to which this humble letter points. Also, consider how you might, simply and humbly,  by a word of encouragement, a note, a gift, a hug, share the love of God with those worshipping Jesus alongside you. 

Joyfully worshipping Jesus with you

Peter+ 

Ps. I'm excited that this Sunday Corey Tabour will be preaching as we continue or journey through the questions Jesus asks. Over the last few weeks a few different resources have been referenced, here are a couple that might be a blessing to you: 

  • The wonderful short film, Godspeed, by Rev. Matt Canlis.

  • Rachel Gilson's thoughtful and challenging article on sexual temptation and the failure of repression.

Peter CoelhoComment